PARENTING

Learning On The Go: Top 3 Life Lessons You Can Teach Your Kids While On Vacation

Learning On The Go:

Top 3 Life Lessons You Can Teach Your Kids While On Vacation:

While the holidays are usually made for relaxing, when you have children you don’t want to waste an occasion of teaching them some valuable lesson about things that are going on around the world.

Many psychologists believe that travelling from a young age can expose children to a variety of cultures and social behaviors so that they can grow up into open-minded and tolerant adults.

In reality, while travelling is extremely beneficial as a learning tool, you don’t always need to go far to teach your children about the most essential values in life.

Here are some awesome ideas for all budgets to inspire your kids to greatness, whether you choose to visit a new country or to stay at home – staycations are, after all, a fantastic and popular holiday trend. From exploring the diversity of beliefs and thoughts to learning to appreciate the goodness of nature, there is a lot to see and discover during your family holiday.

white teddy bear reading book
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

#1:

A Lesson in Diversity & Respect –

If you’ve been saving for something different and magical, you might want to stop yourself from booking a vacation on one of the European beaches to get to Nepal.

Why Nepal?

For a start, you’ll never find another country as rich in culture, history and adventure as Nepal is, and it’s a stunning vacation with children. There are plenty of exciting trekking routes for families, which start in Kathmandu – so you can spend the night at the Fairfield by Marriott Kathmandu before heading to the Himalayas track. Also if you want to avoid tummy trouble, you should stick to the local Nepali dishes.

All in one, you’ll get to experience a variety of lifestyles – there is no power or warm water in specific areas – and a friendly population keen to help and share their temple history with you.


#2:

A Lesson of Simple Tastes & Nature –

As the summer is quickly coming, there’s no better time to plan a picking fruits day with your children. Did you know that in some towns children don’t know where their favorite fruits and vegetables grow?

So, if you want to show your kids that peas don’t just come in a frozen bag and that strawberries don’t grow in jam pots, June, July and August are the best months to explore pick-your-own farms.

If you needed an excuse to bake, summer is the perfect season to make jams and pies with the kids. But ultimately, the key is to remind them that seasonal, local food is usually the best.


#3:

A Lesson of Generosity & Giving –

I know it is a little too soon to be thinking about Christmas, but it’s never too early to discuss with your children ways of giving to those who are less lucky, who don’t receive anything for Christmas.

Question, is it too early to start a Christmas present appeal at home?

Parents are usually divided about it. It’s fair to say that you will have to wait another few months before you check out your local shops and food banks asking for support. However, you can certainly prepare your kids to the idea of sharing with others and ask them if they want to give one of their toys to another child.


Overall

The Holiday time is ultimately a time of reflexion for all.

It’s a time to learn the lessons from the past and come back transformed and enlightened. Whether it’s a lesson of tolerance or local economy, there is a lot your children could learn over your next holiday.


Thanks for reading!

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